13 Deadlines to Know for Your Next Tax Return

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Now that your 2021 tax return is hopefully behind you and we’re more than a quarter of the way through the 2022 tax year, it’s time to start planning for the next set of federal income tax deadlines.

Following is a heads-up on deadlines for the 2022 tax year — the one for which your return is due by April 2023. Mark the deadlines that apply to you on your calendar now so you don’t forget.

April 18, 2022

This is the deadline to:

  • Pay the first installment of 2022 estimated taxes, which applies to the self-employed and other workers who earn income that isn’t subject to withholding. Use IRS Form 1040-ES to pay this tax.

June 15, 2022

This is the deadline to:

  • Pay the second installment of 2022 estimated taxes, which applies to the self-employed and other workers who earn income that isn’t subject to withholding. Use IRS Form 1040-ES to pay this tax.

Sept. 15, 2022

This is the deadline to:

  • Pay the third installment of 2022 estimated taxes, which applies to the self-employed and other workers who earn income that isn’t subject to withholding. Use IRS Form 1040-ES to pay this tax.

Dec. 31, 2022

This is the deadline to:

  • Make 2022 tax-deductible donations to charity. Note that charitable contributions are generally an itemized deduction, meaning you cannot claim them if you take the standard deduction.
  • Make 2022 contributions to most employer-sponsored retirement accounts. These include 401(k) accounts.
  • Spend money in health flexible spending accounts (FSAs). This deadline generally applies if the 2022 health insurance plan year ends Dec. 31. Employers are allowed — but not required — to offer a limited extension.
  • Take 2022 required minimum distributions (RMDs) if you were 72 or older going into 2022. (See “April 1, 2023” below if you turned 72 during 2022.) Note that the penalty for missing this deadline is one of the steepest the IRS levies, as we detail in “3 Tax Penalties That Can Ding Your Retirement Accounts.”

Jan. 17, 2023

This is the deadline to:

  • Pay the fourth installment of 2022 estimated taxes, which applies to the self-employed and other workers who earn income that isn’t subject to withholding. Use IRS Form 1040-ES to pay this tax. One exception: Self-employed people who file their 2022 federal tax return by Jan. 31, 2023, and pay their entire balance due with that return do not have to pay their fourth installment by Jan. 17.

April 1, 2023

This is the deadline to:

April 15, 2023 (presumably)

Generally, this is the deadline to:

April 17, 2023 (presumably)

While the IRS has yet to announce the official date for the next Tax Day, it’s safe to assume it will be postponed until at least April 17, as April 15 falls on a Saturday. That would mean April 17, 2023, or thereabouts is also the deadline to:

  • Make 2022 contributions to individual retirement accounts (IRAs). For the contribution limits, see “IRS Raises 5 Retirement Contribution Limits for 2022.”
  • Request an automatic extension for your 2022 income tax return. Use Form 4868 to request this extension if you can’t file your return on time. Also, note that the extension applies only to filing: You still must pay any taxes you owe by Tax Day to avoid interest charges or penalties.

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